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The SATC Lifestyle

June 1, 2010 1 comment

The Chicago Blackhawks won Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final by a most unexpected, and very exciting 6-5 score, and where was I instead of watching an instant classic… on a double date watching Sex And The City 2! God, help me!

So now I feel the need to write about the cultural phenomenon that is the “SATC lifestyle.” Please God, help me!
A female friend had just seen the latest installment of the franchise on Opening Night, and reported to me about the amazing scene that she witnessed at the local cineplex. Huge groups of women, well-dressed and possibly half drunk, went to the event together. My friend-turned-beat reporter was not to be left out, and was also with ten of her closest friends at the theatre that evening. And from her observations, it truly was something resembling an important cultural event.
As a movie, it was a rather poor two-and-a-half hour marathon, awfully disjointed in its story-telling, and unnecessarily long-winded with far too many scenes having no relevance to the overall story. On the other hand, SATC is a television-turned-movie franchise that has truly captured the imaginations and honest desires of many liberal women, single or married (probably mostly single/dating), many likely 30-something or older, who embrace the virtues of sexual and personal freedoms, and self-empowerment.
And we can certainly say that it is a legitimate form of empowerment simply because this important (female) cultural phenomenon is very much similar to the generally-accepted male mentality and attitudes towards sex and lifestyle. The SATC lifestyle simply reflects many of the same attitudes from a female perspective.
In some ways, the SATC lifestyle is a counter-cultural phenomenon. It’s girl power, but with more common sense and a more realistic line of thought. It’s not really about shouting it out or about being a feminist; rather,  it’s much more about just living a lifestyle that includes clothing and fashion, dating and relationships, sex and friends, personal and professional. It appreciates many of the same values that male culture would embrace about sex, work, life and freedom. And ultimately, it embraces these values by presenting them as intrinsically HUMAN values, while in the meantime, promoting something very different from the male mentality when it comes to personal interests, humour, and discussion topics.
For a man, going to see this movie was a very interesting event to witness and be a part of, and I certainly noticed many of the same things that my female friend noticed about the enthusiastic audience. The in-theatre commentary screamed out from the audience was of a different brand. For example, at a certain point during the movie when I began to complain about how long the movie was, I received a sarcastic response from a woman behind me: “That’s what you get!”
Perhaps this particular woman has taken the SATC lifestyle and attitude to a not-so-charming extreme, as people sometimes do when they find a strong personal appreciation for a piece of popular culture; but overall, it is an interesting cultural phenomenon that is really quite representative of more liberal 21st century attitudes, one that most likely could have only surfaced in the mass media for today’s generation of women. And I would hazard a guess that most women who have a strong appreciation for the franchise see it for what it is: a legitimate source for their own personal and professional empowerment, without resorting to pointless male-bashing and misrepresented political agendas.

And now, I’m off to watch the Stanley Cup Final, Game 2. Go Hawks!

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